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Thread: Is NOT steeping your ejuice bad?

  1. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by supersports600 View Post
    then that one time you put your cereal in the fridge and milk in the cupboard........, playing with fire.
    yep. Inevitable.

    Tested without adding extra vg/pg. Just a mix of 100mg pg nic, some water and contrasting flavours for several hours. Seemed to make a difference. I may do 35C for 24hours next time. Wish I had a stirrer.
    I can't really see that temperature making a difference to nic. 24h at this temp might get similar reaction of 4-5 days. Add to it no extra vg/pg and maybe you get 8+ days>>(totally random guess)

    Of course the best way is to do it slowly. I'm thinking close enough is good enough for me. A little warmth and then shove in cupboard.

    I wont make mistakes with measurements. Started making shirts for my bottles that I write everything on. Strip of paper with hole in centre for head of bottle. Bottle also gets permanent unique id that is added to paper. Helps use same bottle with really strong flavours. eg. CHR9 is for stuff with strong cherry, All pastries/cakes(no cream)/coffee BC[1-9...A-Z].

    Probably get bored with adding a little heat but will usually mix by adding the rest of the pg/vg after steep.


    ]6⁹.12[

  2. #62
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    I use a container of hot water from the tap (but not too hot that you can't stick your finger in) and then a flat bottomed glass goes in the water (in the container). The aim is to get the VG just a little bit runny so that everything is easy to mix using a battery operated hand held frother (see Lordies vid on YT). I now, never use excessive heat, from experience it kills the VG and makes the concentrates bland, you will lose vapor and taste. I've experimented with the microwave and definately DO NOT recommend this method, it kills everything far more effectively than excessive heat if it's timed even a second too much as well as being way too dangerous with everything else that this method may entail.

    IMHO and through observation (so far from what I've come across), some mixes are vapable within a couple of hours and I suspect it's because there's not much concentrates percentage used (e.g. less than 10%). Maybe it's just me, but I've also noticed that juices using less than 10% become very bland (to my taste) after a week although they tasted great for the first 3 days or so.

    I've noticed that juices with a mix of over 10% concentrates start to come good after 4 to 5 days steeping, depending on the percentage of concentrates used. The higher the percentages, the longer the steep time. I've noticed no difference between leaving the cap on or off (e.g. 24 hour cap off method), so I just leave it on (although I must admit to having a very quick "sniff" every couple of days or so which probably airs it out anyway).

    In my opinion steeping definately makes a difference depending on what percentage concentrates are involved with the juice. But I'm just using a basic method and I'm sure there are more involved techniques out there that I haven't tried yet.
    Cheers
    Sodd
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  3. #63
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    Ah steeping, well in brewing we called it standing. If you opened a bottle after 2 weeks meh it was ok, if you opened it after a month it was good, if you opened it after 2 months it was mmmmmmmm beautiful. A good example is I bottled a brew and dated it, I drank the whole lot over a period of time, about 9 months later I was rearranging a cabinet and found one of the brews. Well let me tell you it was pure heaven and I took as long as I could to drink it, so I went looking for answers why.

    What I found was that the gap of air between the liquid and the bottle top was the key factor. So when you make a juice what I suggest is this: Shake the shit out of it put the lid on and LEAVE it on because the air in that gate keeps the pressure on the liquid to combine.
    The Sodd and docta like this.

  4. #64
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    Wayno,
    Very astute observation and makes me wonder ....... However, your brew has pressure involved, whereas no pressure with juice (methinks). BUT, your hypothesis has merit and lends credence to the "cap on" theory when you start thinking about that air gap you mentioned. I'll give it a go even though it will be torture as I'm a compulsive "sniffer". Lol.
    Cheers
    Sodd
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  5. #65
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    It may not be gassed BUT there is a gate that is closed when the top is on, just for an experiment take the top off and nothing happens but give it a little squeeze and you will see a drop being forced up. Why is that? Be assured where there is a gap a gate will materialize be rest assured. It is that gate we need to keep closed to ensure the flavors are forced to combine.

  6. #66
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    Wayno, I have a theory. (I like the pressure with the brewing thing.)
    When opening a jam jar the lid pops up, caused by the vacuum created by the product cooling.
    What if when mixing a juice, cool it down some before lid goes on? That would create some positive pressure when coming back to room temp and help steeping? What thinks you?

  7. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by docta View Post
    Wayno, I have a theory. (I like the pressure with the brewing thing.)
    When opening a jam jar the lid pops up, caused by the vacuum created by the product cooling.
    What if when mixing a juice, cool it down some before lid goes on? That would create some positive pressure when coming back to room temp and help steeping? What thinks you?
    No need to cool it down doc, as you are filling the bottle you are replacing air with liquid. There is the gate at the top, put the lid on shake really well and leave the top on and it will do it's thing as the trapped air dissipates (I think that is how you spell it).

  8. #68
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    The more pressure on a liquid allows more gas to be absorbed. The more head room in a sealed container allows a little more air to be absorbed instead of just carbon dioxide. Liquid does not compress, gas does.
    There is a chance your brew benefited from the extra air in the head space (oxygen, maybe nitrogen). Since beer already releases carbon dioxide, the pressure still exists but it will equalise with less gas in the liquid when there is more head space.

    More head space = more air absorbed
    More head space = Less total gas absorbed into liquid.


    ]6⁹.12[

  9. #69
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    Re the brewing analogy, extended chilling will ensure the gas (in that instance CO2) permeates the liquid, giving good head (shutup!), but since we're not trying to "gas" the juice I don't know how effective it would be at steeping. For my own part, I'm often so lazy I just have a 5ml syringe of 36mg/ml nic and add that directly to whatever flavour e-juice I've already put in my clearomiser at a 1:1 ratio to produce a flavoured nic juice of 18mg/ml approx. It always tastes to me the same as pre-nicced juice of the same flavour. Maybe I'm just not as fussy. I like RY4 pretty much all the time - sometimes with a hint of apple pie or melon but rarely, and again I just put a dribble straight into the clearo.
    I'm sure there's lots of magic that goes on through the whole steeping process, but it must be just too subtle for me to notice.
    Anyhoo, I'm just a noob waht do I know?
    -doc roob

  10. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noe View Post
    Color isn't an indication of age or even steep time.
    Sometimes 10mins more of sunlight can change the color of a juice or a bit of heat. The only real indication is how it tastes.

    Color can be an indication that the nicotine base has been aged by various factors (e.g. heat, light). A fresh batch of nicotine in a vegetable glycerin base will be completely colorless. The flavor of the nicotine will be stronger and much more coarser if it has aged. I would compare it to sandpaper, it's much better when it's fresh and fine, not old and rough.

 

 
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