Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20
Like Tree14Likes

Thread: Difference between Volts and Watts?

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Posts
    44

    Difference between Volts and Watts?

    Hi,
    Eg.
    Variable Voltage: 3.0 6.0 volts
    Variable Wattage: 3.0 15.0 W

    How does voltage and watts relate to how an e-cig function?

  2. #2
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    sydney
    Posts
    2,445
    Vaping E-Cigs Voltage Vs. Watts - YouTube
    Understanding Variable Voltage / Variable Wattage E-cigs
    E-Cigarette Forum

    and probably somewhere here too. too long to write on that subject at this time.

    sleepy.
    amount saved by not smoking: $lots
    amount spent on vaping: $not enough

  3. #3
    Junior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    8
    I'm a relative noob, but doesn't it just mean that:

    - If you're adjusting voltage manually, the mod will adjust wattage accordingly to suit.
    - If you're adjusting wattage manually, the mod will adjust voltage to suit.

    All things being equal, nothing should have to be adjusted by the mod automatically, but in reality things change. Your coil might change resistance depending on environment/juice/degradation/swapping tanks or your battery drops voltage over time. As you would generally prefer vaping at a certain wattage sweet spot (whether you realise it or not), you should just set the mod to that particular wattage, and it will adjust voltage accordingly to maintain a consistent vape. I think....

    I don't have a mod yet (but it's in the mail!).

  4. #4
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    1,549
    Wattage is a measure of power, or in simpler terms for our purposes the amount of electricity is converted to heat at the coil. It a function of the voltage and the resistance of the coil, specifically voltage x voltage / resistance.

    With variable voltage you have the ability to adjust the voltage directly, which when taking a particular coil resistance into account will result in a given wattage.

    With variable wattage devices, you can adjust the desired power, or heat, while letting the device pick the calculated voltage based on the measured resistance of the coil attached.

    In some ways the variable wattage is a "smarter" system as the device will deliver the same amount of power regardless of whether you attach a low or high resistance coil. However in a practical sense, many still prefer to alter the voltage directly as the additional variables in a vapourisation system means that a low resistance set up and high resistance set up at the same calculated power perform differently.

    This thread may also help your understanding: A simple wattage chart showing the relationship between voltage and resistance
    Robray, kritikal, Fatman and 1 others like this.
    ಠ_ಠ

  5. #5
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    3,228
    Quote Originally Posted by luntingsir View Post
    Wattage is a measure of power..
    "Wattage" is a made up word, the correct term is power. You don't set the "wattage", you set the power. (The same is true for "voltage" (the correct term is potential difference), but that one is so far embedded in people's minds that there's no return.)
    Power is a measure of a unit of energy (j/joules) per unit of time (s/second). 1W = 1j/s

    Sorry Lunt, nothing personal, I just absolutely despise the term "wattage", it's like saying "kilometre-per-hourage" instead of speed. You've covered well for what a vaper needs though.
    Last edited by kritikal; 01-07-14 at 06:21 AM.
    Fatman, luntingsir and coopz like this.

    (*Susceptible to sloppy moderation)

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Melbourne, Vic
    Posts
    802
    Uhhhh... Wattage is not a made up word. Wattage refers to the measurement unit of Watts or Power meaning; 1 Watt is equal to 1 Joule Per Second thus measures the amount of energy transfer, in this case the amount of energy transferred into heat. 1 watt is therefore the amount of work done to pass 1 amp through a circuit of 1 volt.

    Good description by Lunt. I personally prefer VV I think VW is somewhat of a moot point to achieve the same outcome, although a fan of VW would say the same for VV.
    Last edited by jman; 01-07-14 at 11:41 AM.
    There's 10 types of people in this world that understand binary: those who do and those who don't.

  7. #7
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,368
    sorry krit but jman and lunt are right
    think light bulbs, 40watt 60watt, 100watt etc
    Its not made up, its a quantifiable measurement.

  8. #8
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Bunbury WA
    Posts
    405
    Look up Wattage in the dictionary.

  9. #9
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    3,228
    Quote Originally Posted by jman View Post
    Uhhhh... Wattage is not a made up word. Wattage refers to the measurement unit of Watts or Power meaning; 1 Watt is equal to 1 Joule Per Second thus measures the amount of energy transfer, in this case the amount of energy transferred into heat. 1 watt is therefore the amount of work done to pass 1 amp through a circuit of 1 volt.

    Good description by Lunt. I personally prefer VV I think VW is somewhat of a moot point to achieve the same outcome, although a fan of VW would say the same for VV.
    No, the Watt is the unit of measurement for power, which is 100% okay. "Wattage" on the other hand is incorrect terminology, extremely incorrect terminology.

    So, instead of saying "I have the wattage set to 18 Watts" you would say "I have the power set to 18 Watts". It's simple, really.

    (*Susceptible to sloppy moderation)

  10. #10
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    3,228
    ^^^^^^^^^^
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobthebuilder View Post
    sorry krit but jman and lunt are right
    think light bulbs, 40watt 60watt, 100watt etc
    Its not made up, its a quantifiable measurement.
    In which case the amount of Watts generated from these light bulbs would be their "power output" not their "wattage".
    Last edited by kritikal; 01-07-14 at 04:31 PM.

    (*Susceptible to sloppy moderation)

 

 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.4
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
All times are GMT +11. The time now is 10:38 AM.