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Thread: Looking To Buy An Ohm Meter

  1. #1
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    Looking To Buy An Ohm Meter

    Hi,

    Need some help.

    I just went to buy an ohm meter (not multi meter) and thought I could get one for around $20. Then I saw this thread.

    best sub-ohm 510 meter ?

    Wow! $800 to accurately measure sub ohms! So my question is to sub ohm vapers. What do you guys use?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    fad
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toe Tall Noob View Post
    Hi,

    Need some help.

    I just went to buy an ohm meter (not multi meter) and thought I could get one for around $20. Then I saw this thread.

    best sub-ohm 510 meter ?

    Wow! $800 to accurately measure sub ohms! So my question is to sub ohm vapers. What do you guys use?

    Thank you.
    Most people are using either their regulated devices to check resistance, or one of these:



    The discussions of meters in the $800 to $15,000 range are for people that are building stupidly sub-ohm coils,
    ones where there are one (or more) zeros to the right of the decimal point. eg: 0.05 ohm

    Stick to around 0.8 - 0.4 ohm coils, and make sure you do your homework on ohms law, power
    and the constant amp rating of the batteries you're going to use.

  3. #3
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    biggest thing you got to do is work out how far off your meter reads.
    get some really thick, clean copper wire and short the 510 pin to the outside and see what it reads.
    0.0something won't be a major problem, but if it reads 0.2/3/4 and you're trying to set up a sub ohm it's a big variance on what you're trying to build
    Fatman and Toddosh like this.
    Quit date : 10/5/2011

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toe Tall Noob View Post
    Hi,

    Need some help.

    I just went to buy an ohm meter (not multi meter) and thought I could get one for around $20. Then I saw this thread.

    best sub-ohm 510 meter ?

    Wow! $800 to accurately measure sub ohms! So my question is to sub ohm vapers. What do you guys use?

    Thank you.
    OHM Reader FOR Atomizer Cartomizer OHM Resistance Tester | eBay <-- $22 including shipping, in oz
    JWH likes this.

  5. #5
    JWH
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    Hello I use one of these and the charge on one lasts for soooo many builds, try the juice there as well USB Rechargeable Ohm Reader &ndash; VapourEyes

  6. #6
    J-D
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    Quote Originally Posted by aussievapes View Post
    That one looks pretty neat

    I just bought a whole heap of different ohm readers and took em to my mates place who has a a very high end fluke and cross checked everything, threw all but one out. I sub ohm but no where near to where the accuracy i have is needed as fad mentioned

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by D1git View Post
    biggest thing you got to do is work out how far off your meter reads.
    get some really thick, clean copper wire and short the 510 pin to the outside and see what it reads.
    0.0something won't be a major problem, but if it reads 0.2/3/4 and you're trying to set up a sub ohm it's a big variance on what you're trying to build

    This is great advice,alot of ohm readers and even expensive multi meters have inbuilt resistance from any where from .1-.9ohm and if you are planning on sub ohming (which I assume why you are asking) this is a pretty important thing to no about your reader.If you are planning on staying around .5ohm and above most off the shelf easy to find ohm checkers will all you should really need.Cheers
    JWH likes this.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by D1git View Post
    biggest thing you got to do is work out how far off your meter reads.
    get some really thick, clean copper wire and short the 510 pin to the outside and see what it reads.
    0.0something won't be a major problem, but if it reads 0.2/3/4 and you're trying to set up a sub ohm it's a big variance on what you're trying to build
    Quote Originally Posted by Toddosh View Post
    This is great advice,alot of ohm readers and even expensive multi meters have inbuilt resistance from any where from .1-.9ohm and if you are planning on sub ohming (which I assume why you are asking) this is a pretty important thing to no about your reader.If you are planning on staying around .5ohm and above most off the shelf easy to find ohm checkers will all you should really need.Cheers
    ^^^^^^ This

    Never take it for granted a meter reads right or wrong whether it be a Fluke or a Fasttech Atomiser checker with 510 connector .

    Calibration is the key .... accuracy can only come about once you know the variance the system you use has .

    Most quality suppliers of kanthal etc will be able to tell you the resistance per foot ( or meter) their particular stock has ... 0 your meter as above , then cut an exact length of wire @ room temperature ( 20 deg) and measure again ... if your numbers come up one way or the other , you will know which way your meter is prone to misread and by how much ... If you can be bothered
    D1git, davee, Altered1 and 2 others like this.
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  9. #9
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    It's not only the lead and internal resistance of (even high end) multimeters that are the problem. They are actually not designed to read accurately at the extreme low end of their resistance ranges.

    Here's an example, neglecting lead resistance, the Fluke 179 has a base accuracy of 0.9% of the resistance reading on its lowest range. Not too shabby, but...

    It also has a +2 count uncertainty. What does that mean?

    Well, on the lowest range (600 Ohms for this meter) the resolution is 0.1 Ohms (600.0 down to 000.0 Ohms) that last digit (the "least significant digit" or LSD) can be wrong by +/-2 counts. in this case that means +/- 0.2 Ohms. This is on top of the 0.9% accuracy error. Hence the specification, "0.9% +2 counts" in the manual.

    A 0.5 Ohm resistance measured with this meter could read anywhere between 0.3 and 0.7 Ohms. That's a +/- 40% error! The base accuracy (0.9%) is dwarfed by the count uncertainty error.

    The count uncertainty error becomes less of a problem as the measured value increases. (0.2 Ohm becomes a smaller and smaller percentage as the resistance being measured increases). It is equal to the 0.9% basic accuracy only when measuring 22 Ohms. Above this the base accuracy figure dominates.

    I'm not certain if the count uncertainty is repeatable for each meter. e.g. Say a meter reads 1 digit too high, will it always read 1 digit too high?

    Subtracting the measurement of a supposed 0 Ohm (thick copper wire) may not be wise. The count error may change significantly with battery voltage, time and/or temperature. I'm not sure and am still trying to find out.

    UPDATE: the consensus of those in the know seems to be that the count error is repeatable over short periods of time. So you can use the REL (relative function) or manually subtract a known "0 Ohm" reading. Though you should still bear in mind you're trying to measure the width of a grain of sand with a meter stick.
    Last edited by Sponky; 02-09-14 at 09:49 PM.

 

 

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