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Thread: USB charger internals

  1. #1
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    USB charger internals

    In case anyone is interested, this is what's inside your basic 510 battery charger.

    Charger:
    USB (Small).jpg

    PCB:
    2013-02-07 10.45.26 (Small).jpg

    2013-02-07 10.45.41 (Small).jpg



    The IC is just a basic Li-ion charger regulator. SL1053. Features charge status indication, charge termination, battery temperature monitoring, high accuracy current and voltage regulation. I'm guessing the temperature monitoring is not used seeing as there is no temp sense wire going to the battery, just positive and negative. Other stats are here: SL1053
    Other than that, all that's on the circuit board are a few resistors and a single transistor which runs the charge control output. I'm guessing the chip across the output terminal is a reverse polarity protection diode. And of course there is the charge indication LED. That's it. Cheap and cheerful, but pretty safe and simple. Unfortunately the downfall of the device isn't the circuit board design or chip, it's the input and output soldering. the only thing holding the USB connector to the board is the + and - input prong soldering. The reinforcing prongs aren't soldered down (they are in the pics, but I added that solder trying to fix the device.) And the output leads are very very thin (again, not in the picture, I reinforced them), so much so that the positive lead fell off when I opened the charger. I imagine this usually isn't an issue because the plastic casing ends up holding it all together. I'm not sure what the problem is with my device, I think the chip must be damaged because the charge behaviour is borked. Either that or the pcb is cracked somehow.

    Just thought this might be of interest to someone. Also please correct me if any of my assumptions are wrong. I'm not an electrical engineer!

    EDIT: now I look again, the part across the output is marked as a capacitor, which would be for noise reduction.
    Last edited by nero82; 07-02-13 at 11:06 AM.
    MrGruffy likes this.

 

 

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