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Thread: Quit line helps (NOT)

  1. #1
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    Quit line helps (NOT)

    a couple of things I've read lately brought this to mind. one time when I tried to quit, I took full advantage of the quit line and had, for a very short period, regular contact by phone with my quit coach. I didn't find a lot of her comments terribly helpful. when I asked her how long it was since she'd had a smoke, it turned out that she had NEVER HAD A CIGARETTE IN HER LIFE!!!! and there she was, trying to coach me on quitting! these are the people the government is hiring to help people give up smoking. your tax dollars hard at work

  2. #2
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    Really no different to politicians giving some wanker a new portfolio in a field he's never worked in/experienced or otherwise!

    Jeeez don't get me started!!! (as I reach for a vape!)
    kay67kay likes this.

  3. #3
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    That was what I suspected after looking at all the Quit info online, that it was put together by people who had never been nicotine dependent, it totally put me off the idea of even calling the Quitline as I expected it to be also run by never-smokers.
    kay67kay likes this.

  4. #4
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    Yep, it's chronic. I work with clients with multiple addictions, but it's some of my colleagues that do my head in.

    Just the other day my team leader was telling me that I shouldn't forget the role that 'personal responsibility' plays (or rather doesn't) in our clients predicament. It was one of many, many moments when I've felt that being a nic addict gives me compassion and understanding that 'nice wholesome' people often lack.

    Walk a mile in my shoes before you judge......and all that.
    essiemessy likes this.

  5. #5
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    yep, you can read all you want about something, but until you've been there, you can't possibly understand fully. and it happens with so many things. I remember years ago, working in a library that was being remodelled. the architect who designed the front desk had never worked in a library before, and once it was all built, we had to improvise all sorts of work areas so we could do our jobs, cos the architect's design was so totally not fit for purpose it wasn't funny.

  6. #6
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    I've battled a number of addictions in my life - all of which (except nicotine) I kicked in the 90's. The only thing that worked for me in my battle with those substances was initial hospitalization and detox, but *staying* off those substances during the crucial first year was down to tough love from those who had walked down the same path - people who I could trust, who knew exactly where I was coming from, who were there for encouragement when I needed it and also kicked my ass when I was being a manipulative whiney sod - but the empathy I think was the most important aspect; it left little room for weak excuses on my part.

    An addict can sniff a non-addict a mile off and a non-addict should not be employed in the field of first-stage D&A counselling IMO; whatever the substance. I've found the use of non-addicts actually helps set people up for a bust.
    margyb, HSV, kay67kay and 4 others like this.

  7. #7
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    absolutely. that's why the 12 step programs work. they're run by recovering addicts for recovering addicts, not some smarmy do-gooders who go home each day, smugly patting themselves on the back for all the help they've given "those poor unfortunates"
    GirlyPantz and JenJ like this.

  8. #8
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    I have some issues with 12 step programs, but without the basic concepts of them and the people involved who supported me, I'd be dead - or worse (I discovered during my 'dark days' there are certainly worse things than death).
    GirlyPantz, margyb and xen like this.

  9. #9
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    Sounds like you haven't just tiptoed across the surface of life Icarus.

    I firmly believe it's relationships that heal, not theories, methods, or programs. Which is really frustrating in my line of work because maintaining professional boundaries and 'detachment' is more highly valued than genuineness.
    GirlyPantz likes this.

  10. #10
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    I understand the importance of detachment - it helps to protect the one delivering the help as so often there is 'failure' and other risks; but yeh, when it overrides the actual relationship, that's a problem as the addict detects it.

    Detachment is also important for the addict as a protection, but that comes a little ways down the track; dependency is heavy in the early days of recovery because it needs to be.

    I've gotta say though that I don't think any 12 step program would have helped me with smoking .

    Even during my various 'tours of duty' of medical establishments in the 90's, most addicts I came into contact with (substances from sleepers to smack) felt that smoking was the toughest to kick long-term.

    .. but that was before ecigs heh.

 

 
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