Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Melbourne's leafy outer East
    Posts
    3,656

    BigPharma and the mafia

    Systematic corruption

    Most of Peter’s book is devoted to building up the case that the drug industry has systematically corrupted science to play up the benefits and play down the harms of their drugs. As an epidemiologist with very high numerical literacy and a passion for detail, so that he is a world leader in critiquing clinical studies, Peter is here on very solid ground. He joins many others, including former editors of the New England Journal of Medicine, in showing this corruption. He shows too how the industry has bought doctors, academics, journals, professional and patient organisations, university departments, journalists, regulators, and politicians. These are the methods of the mob.

    The book doesn’t let doctors and academics avoid blame. Indeed, it might be argued that drug companies are doing what is expected of them in maximising financial returns for shareholders, but doctors and academics are supposed to have a higher calling. Laws that are requiring companies to declare payments to doctors are showing that very high proportions of doctors are beholden to the drug industry and that many are being paid six figures sums for advising companies or giving talks on their behalf. It’s hard to escape the conclusion that these “key opinion leaders” are being bought. They are the “hired guns” of the industry.

    BMJ Group blogs: BMJ » Blog Archive » Richard Smith: Is the pharmaceutical industry like the mafia?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Melbourne's leafy outer East
    Posts
    3,656
    Conflicts of Interest Often Under-reported in Clinical Trials.

    CHICAGO -- At least half of clinical trial study authors fail to report relevant conflicts of interest, according to an analysis of papers presented here Monday at the Peer Review Congress.

    Kristine Rasmussen, of the Nordic Cochrane Centre in Copenhagen, and colleagues took advantage of the fact that Danish physicians are required to apply for permission for paid collaboration with industry, and then publicly disclose all of their conflicts, to look at 100 consecutive drug trials with at least one Danish author.

    About half -- 48% -- of researchers with conflicts related to the trial sponsor or manufacturer failed to disclose some or all of them. That number rose to 88% when the authors looked at conflicts related to competing manufacturers, and 89% for any drugmaker at all.

    Of the 100 reports, 49 were funded by industry, 30 had mixed sponsorship, 19 were not funded by industry, and two did not specify.


    Conflicts of Interest Often Under-reported in Clinical Trials

 

 

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.4
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
All times are GMT +11. The time now is 04:33 PM.