Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 60
Like Tree111Likes

Thread: Are e-cigarettes safe?

  1. #1
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    868

    Are e-cigarettes safe?

    Discussion between Carl Philips of CASAA and Stanton Glantz of Tobacco Control, Research and Education.


  2. #2
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,368
    my god
    the guy with the beard should be struck off for blatant lies to the very public he is meant to be helping
    Old Dog and spud like this.

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Esperance Western Australia
    Posts
    3,627
    Quote Originally Posted by Rose View Post
    Discussion between Carl Philips of CASAA and Stanton Glantz of Tobacco Control, Research and Education.

    Interesting the common trait among the control freaks, (control being the operative word in Glantz's title, not unlike Chapman, the tobacco part is just their control vehicle of choice), is that they have really bad manners. They are rude, constantly butting in, not wanting anyone else to be heard. To me this suggests that they are scared, they are losing control. They are becoming irrelevant, and on some level they know this, even if vaping was banned, there are enough people who know the benefits of vaping for a whole global black market. In fact, in some ways banning e-cigs will only add to their popularity as people will want to know what it is about vaping that so frightens the control freaks in public health and government.
    All opinions expressed by me, are my own, I do not represent, or speak for, anyone but myself.






    STOPPED SMOKING 11/08/13 STARTED VAPING 11/08/13

  4. #4
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    5,952
    I think the problem with Carl Phillips peer reviewed studies saying ecigs don't help people quit is that e-cig use is still so new. The majority of the participants in the studies are likely to be people who've dabbled with e-cigs, not people who have used PV's solely in the long term, ie months or years.

    I was one of those people. I tried an cigalike a year or so before I took up vaping and thought it was pretty unsatisfactory, it didn't give me the throat hit and vapor that would have kept me interested in them. If they were as available here as they are in the US I probably would have bought some of them (instead of just trying my friend's one a few times), but I doubt they would have got me to stop smoking. I'm sure I would have been doing the dual use thing too, probably indefinately.

    It's going to take a while before the studies start coming out on PV users rather than cigalike users.

    However, I am starting to agree with Carl Phillips that nicotine is not as harmless as we all want to believe. As he said, it does change the chemicals in your brain, it high jacks the chemical reward system and over time (even a short time for some people), our dopamine response becomes irrevocably linked to nicotine which means that for many of us an absence of nicotine equates to depression.

    I find this very scary in terms of young people having easy access to nicotine in the form of vaping. I think young people really need to know this. They should know that nicotine for some people (even many people) is self medication, and if the reasons for needing that crutch are addressed before they get on the nicotine roller coaster, in terms of healthier ways of increasing dopamine (exercise, accomplishment, ect) then they have a chance to be free, rather than chained to nicotine forever more.

    In terms of life long use of PV's, it's quite precarious. We are dependent on the availability of nicotine flavourings, devices and replacement parts, and a power source. It's quite a juggling act to get everything together and keep it all running smoothly. Having my sense of well being and ability to function properly dependent on so many factors out of my control scares me. If you live a very routine and secure life it's probably fine, but my life isn't really like that and I don't really want it to be either. I'd rather be free of nicotine dependence, but at my age and stage of long term nic dependence, it's looking ominous!

    I think vaping nicotine definitely needs some very strict regulation, particularly in the form of education about nicotine dependence. Young people need to know the extreme limiting affect nicotine has in the long term so that they can make informed choices. I don't like the way we keep saying nicotine is harmless....it may be harmless in the physical sense, but it's certainly not harmless in a psychological one.
    Last edited by JenJ; 19-09-13 at 10:26 AM.
    gregds, tally-ho and DoofPopClown like this.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Melbourne's leafy outer East
    Posts
    3,656
    Quote Originally Posted by JenJ View Post
    I don't like the way we keep saying nicotine is harmless....it may be harmless in the physical sense, but it's certainly not harmless in a psychological one.
    Tell me about these 'psychological' harms connected to nicotine, I've only ever experienced benefits.
    margyb and Rose like this.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Melbourne's leafy outer East
    Posts
    3,656
    Quote Originally Posted by Bobthebuilder View Post
    my god
    the guy with the beard should be struck off for blatant lies to the very public he is meant to be helping
    He's a real charmer, eh !

    Stanton Glantz

  7. #7
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    868
    Dave Dorn and co discussing this interview first up on Vapour Trails TV

    GirlyPantz and Olfella like this.

  8. #8
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    5,952
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dog View Post
    Tell me about these 'psychological' harms connected to nicotine, I've only ever experienced benefits.
    It high jacks the dopamine system in the brain. The reward system was designed by evolution to keep us motivated to survive, dopamine (or it's feel good effects) is the reward for actions that enhance our survival like, eating, bonding, sex, overcoming challenges, and accomplishment. Most drugs, and particularly nicotine, affect the brain by releasing dopamine, endorphins and other reward chemicals.

    So without a nicotine or other drug dependence those things I listed produce the same high and feeling of wellbeing they have for eons.....after dependence becomes entrenched the things I listed no longer work to make us feel good, or feel that life is rewarding -only the drug makes us feel that way.

    It's too late for me, but if I can contribute to helping young people know that the harm of nicotine is in undermining the brains reward system and creating dependence on something outside yourself for psychological equilibrium, then that can only be a good thing in my mind.

  9. #9
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    868
    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dog View Post
    He's a real charmer, eh !

    Stanton Glantz
    I've been out of touch lately. So Simon Chapman's ally in the U.S. is a mechanic?! lol This is getting interesting. It's going to be fun watching these two lose the fight. Vaping politics just got interesting again.
    Old Dog likes this.

  10. #10
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Victoria
    Posts
    868
    Quote Originally Posted by JenJ View Post
    It high jacks the dopamine system in the brain. The reward system was designed by evolution to keep us motivated to survive, dopamine (or it's feel good effects) is the reward for actions that enhance our survival like, eating, bonding, sex, overcoming challenges, and accomplishment. Most drugs, and particularly nicotine, affect the brain by releasing dopamine, endorphins and other reward chemicals.

    So without a nicotine or other drug dependence those things I listed produce the same high and feeling of wellbeing they have for eons.....after dependence becomes entrenched the things I listed no longer work to make us feel good, or feel that life is rewarding -only the drug makes us feel that way.

    It's too late for me, but if I can contribute to helping young people know that the harm of nicotine is in undermining the brains reward system and creating dependence on something outside yourself for psychological equilibrium, then that can only be a good thing in my mind.
    So no-one on this forum enjoys food or sex?

    :???:
    Old Dog likes this.

 

 
Page 1 of 6 123 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.4
Copyright © 2019 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
All times are GMT +11. The time now is 04:37 PM.