Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 20 of 20
Like Tree31Likes

Thread: Thoughts on how Batteries should be Regulated

  1. #11
    emu
    emu is offline
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    West Australia
    Posts
    1,878
    Quote Originally Posted by Danny76 View Post
    Just a question why can these battery's not be protected like a say 18650 torch battery. I see the general limit on these torch battery are 4/8 amps. Why can they not protect em up to the batterys rating say 20 amps for a hg2. Pls enlighten me.

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    Just picked up a 5000 lux torch from the reject shop, can't believe how bright this thing is. Takes 3 x AAA batts or 1 x 18650 so I get to use my Sammies and Sony's that would otherwise be sitting in the draw, nothing wrong with them just prefer my chocolates these days.

    They should have supplied a sleeve for the 18650 though especially with the positive end sitting on a spring, if the insulator was missing or damaged it could dead short really easily.

    It's not just about limiting the amps but the design of things needs to be done with safety in mind especially with high discharge batts like 18650's.

    I'll make my own sleeve to keep the batt central in the tube but most people won't even think about it, just shows how dangerous things can become even when nothing to do with vaping gear.




    Bargain for 10 bucks

  2. #12
    AVF Newbie | Be nice to me
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Tweed
    Posts
    71
    Going a little OT here, I'm reading that Sony no longer make the VTC batteries. I just purchased several new VTC5s from Supersports600
    and I'm presuming they are old stock?

    https://www.powerstream.com/sony-vtc...ity-letter.htm

    https://www.vapeloft.com/blog/ultima...battery-safety

  3. #13
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    799
    My understanding is Sony still make the VTC5A and VTC6 batteries.

    VTC5A is suitable for mechanical mods and VTC6 is suitable for regulated mods.
    emu likes this.

  4. #14
    emu
    emu is offline
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    West Australia
    Posts
    1,878
    All safe now, still think they should have supplied a tube for using the 18650 because it says it on the package that you can use 18650.


    fabricator4, Danny76 and rockmoose like this.

  5. #15
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Sep 2016
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,355
    The noisy cricket v2 has sleaves inside the battery compartment for added safety i think this should be a standard feature on all mods

    Sent from my SM-G900I using Tapatalk
    emu likes this.

  6. #16
    emu
    emu is offline
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    West Australia
    Posts
    1,878
    Fingers crossed these batteries are released soon....

    New battery tech from Innokin looks revolutionary - Vaping360
    gert, fabricator4 and Danny76 like this.

  7. #17
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Mackay
    Posts
    7,612
    Quote Originally Posted by emu View Post
    Fingers crossed these batteries are released soon....

    New battery tech from Innokin looks revolutionary - Vaping360
    I'm thinking it's probably a type of super capacitor based on the "charging at a rate that is one hundred times faster" which is a characteristic of super capacitors. There was a small portable drill/driver that was released about 10 years ago that used super capacitors. I wanted one to play with so bad but couldn't justify the purchase. I think Bunnings were selling them, it might have been from Bosch, certainly one of the name brands. I was looking for something like that recently but could find nothing - they seem to have disappeared. I can only assume the technology was found to have some kind of flaw such as shorter than expected service life, similar to the way you can kill Li-ion batteries by flattening them completely.

    I'll be interested to see what the technology is and what the specs are. Super capacitors should have some promise since the technology is half battery and half capacitor, but they just need to get the plate chemistry right. I think the big development labs shifted to working on lithium technologies and graphene.
    emu likes this.
    Chris: Tobacco free since 17:00 15th March 2013.


  8. #18
    emu
    emu is offline
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    West Australia
    Posts
    1,878
    Just a snippet interesting though...

    The battery is able to handle a high volume of power transfers because it has a uniquely built cell structure that is equivalent to the lifespan of one hundred traditional cells. This technology utilizes advanced chemistry within the cells, making them safer to use in sustained high-power applications.
    fabricator4 likes this.

  9. #19
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Mackay
    Posts
    7,612
    Quote Originally Posted by emu View Post
    Just a snippet interesting though...

    The battery is able to handle a high volume of power transfers because it has a uniquely built cell structure that is equivalent to the lifespan of one hundred traditional cells. This technology utilizes advanced chemistry within the cells, making them safer to use in sustained high-power applications.
    Yep, still sounding like super capacitors. They have an electrolyte like both batteries and electrolytic capacitors, and "plates" the same as both of them. My understanding is that what makes it a "super" or "ultra" capacitor is actually the same thing that differentiates it from a "battery" (cell) and that is the very low internal resistance and high rate of charge.

    The technology is there and has been around for a while. I just can't find out why it hasn't been developed successfully. One suggestion is that the capacity is a lot less than the batteries that have been available at that same point in history, however the other side of this coin is that it's not so much of a problem with super capacitors because they can charge in half a minute if you have the right power supply to do it (tens of amps, so hundreds of watts in some cases). In these kinds of systems the power supply that is the battery charger can be a significant part of the cost. Slower constant current chargers would be cheaper but would obviously take longer to charge the device.
    emu likes this.
    Chris: Tobacco free since 17:00 15th March 2013.


  10. #20
    emu
    emu is offline
    AVF Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
    Location
    West Australia
    Posts
    1,878
    Probably be expensive to if they are as good as they reckon.

 

 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Powered by vBulletin® Version 4.2.4
Copyright © 2017 vBulletin Solutions, Inc. All rights reserved.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0
All times are GMT +11. The time now is 11:02 AM.