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Thread: How to modify your atty for bottom feeding Reos and other Squonkers

  1. #1
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    How to modify your atty for bottom feeding Reos and other Squonkers

    This is posted in response to a discussion in another thread, it is just my experience and has no authority in itself, if anyone wants to chime in with better suggestions I am more than happy to learn from others, but here it is.

    I favor drilled post vs dremmelled side of post, however sometimes like with the Veritas I just can't be bothered to redesign the whole atty to make way for a hollow pin.
    As Dogman has said 1/16 is the drill bit size to use for the main bore up the pin, any larger and you can compromise the post's integrity, any smaller and you are even more likely to break a bit off in your post and write off the post due to the usually impossible task of removing it.
    The last batch of bottom feed drilling I have done was on a mini lathe, so much easier and less stressful that with the drill press, however I have achieved it with a drill press many times in the past.
    There are a few tricks I have learned along the way that would have saved me hours of sweat and tears, countless broken drill bits and written off posts.

    1. Stainless steel or SS work hardens much quicker under the heat and pressure of drilling than you might imagine, so coolant is vital especially with such a small SS part as a post.
    High speed steel or HSS is more than adequate to drill SS a long as you avoid work hardening the SS, as soon as you work harden the SS it's pretty much game over, and it becomes like drilling stone with a pencil.
    I now use PG as my lubricant and coolant.

    2. The speed of the drill is important, too to slow and you increase the chance of the tiny drill bit catching in the hole as you drill it.
    So I set my drill press to it's highest speed.

    3. Gripping the post in a vice is a recipe for disaster in my opinion, if you by chance manage to vice it up square to the drill chuck the only way to get it to stay there while being drilled is by tightening the vice to the point where you risk damaging the post.
    Trying to encourage the drill bit to fin the center of that post base is a nightmare, and although you can drill right down the threaded hole as I have in the past the risk of damaging the threads is very real if you have any kind of problem.
    The solution is not to spin the drill bit, but to spin the post.
    What you will need is a chuck to hold the drill bit that will be held by your vice, this will do the trick: PCB Drill Chuck | Drill & Socket Sets | Hand Tools | Tools & Soldering | PRODUCTS | TD2010 | Jaycar Electronics
    At $9.95 it will save you much more than that in the long run.
    So the post is held in the drill press chuck and your 1/16th drill bit in the PCB drill chuck.
    you still have to line up your post base center and the drill bit, but your drill bit will be much more eager to find the post base center than you though possible.

    4. The actual drilling in my experience is best done in multiple shallow dives, Don't rush it!!, using enough coolant to lubricate and cool the SS post as you go, the PG is great because it will start to vaporise and steam if you get the post and drill bit too hot.
    You need to put enough pressure to make the drill bit cut, but not so much as to jam it up, this takes practice, and gets much easier with experience, but with the info I have given you here it should be a fair fighting chance even from the first go.

    5. Feed hole/s in the side/s of the post are also a challenge, the biggest of which is starting the hole, and avoiding the drill bit skipping all over the surface of the side of the post. Measuring exactly where you want the feed to exit the post is another.
    I always aim to have my feed port/s below the lowest point of the deck for good drainage, and I usually achieve this by removing part of the insulator, leaving a slight step down between the deck and the feed port, this then tells me where I should drill the port.
    Once you have you port marked on the post you can leave a 1/16th drill bill in the whole you have just drilled up through the post to ensure you don't crush the post when you use a center punch to mark the start of the hole, it will also protect it clamp it in the vice hard enough to grip it firmly.
    Using your punch mark to guide the start of the whole again use coolant and short repeated dives, once you have a good start on the whole you can remove the 1/16 drill bet to enable you to complete the hole.
    you can get away with a 1.5mm hole/drill bit and especially if you are going right through the post to create two ports I would definitely only go for a max of 1.5mm holes.
    If this all seems to hard then a careful slice with the dremmel disk can also make a satisfactory feed port, however the slice needs the edges smoothing before you insert the post back into the insulator or you can jam the post as you gouge the insulator.

    cheers
    SV
    Last edited by studiovape; 25-05-15 at 12:08 AM.
    Vaping since July 2012.

  2. #2
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    Great info.

    Tldr - if you want to get an atty drilled, kindly speak to sv :P
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  3. #3
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    SV, cutting speed for mild steel is 100'/min (yes, I'm old school) which means if you are using a 1" drill, the speed should be ~400rpm. For 1/16" drill, speed should be about 6,400rpm (16 x 400). Cutting speed for SS is obviously less, maybe 30'/min? but that still means ~2,000 rpm for 1/16" drill.

    Just FYI


    And ... great info from personal experience mate
    Last edited by gtadmin; 24-05-15 at 11:10 PM.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtadmin View Post
    SV, cutting speed for mild steel is 100'/min (yes, I'm old school) which means if you are using a 1" drill, the speed should be ~400rpm. For 1/16" drill, speed should be about 6,400rpm (16 x 400). Cutting speed for SS is obviously less, maybe 30'/min? but that still means ~2,000 rpm for 1/16" drill.

    Just FYI

    And ... great info from personal experience mate
    Thanks for that GT, my cronky old drill press is a Chinese PIS, I imagine it dreams of getting upto 2000rpm, but it's on it's fasted belt set up, so it's as close as can be I imagine (thank god for Floorzone's mini lathe ), care to comment on why the speed is recommended at what it is?
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  5. #5
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    For more info: Article: Speeds and feeds for drilling and reaming stainless steels

    Why is 100'/min the recommended speed for mild steel? Most economical in terms of tooling life and turnaround of each piece is my best guess (I last did this theory 45 years ago )

    ETA: that's with HSS tools, carbide tipped is higher

    ETA2: http://littlemachineshop.com/referen...s.php#Drilling cutting speed for SS is 50'/min
    Last edited by gtadmin; 24-05-15 at 11:29 PM.
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  6. #6
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    Also, when centre popping for the cross drill, they recommend the smallest dimple possible as the action of centre popping it can work harden that area, and make it difficult for the drill to break through the surface.

    I use one of those spring loaded ones.
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by gtadmin View Post
    Also, when centre popping for the cross drill, they recommend the smallest dimple possible as the action of centre popping it can work harden that area, and make it difficult for the drill to break through the surface.

    I use one of those spring loaded ones.
    This is a good point GT, and when I was writing this I was trying to think of a better system, I think I have now, drill a 1.5mm or 1/16th hole in the side of one of these and clamp it onto the post, may need to drill out center hole a smidge but no big deal : Landing Gear Wheel Stop Set Collar 8x3.1mm (10pcs) they are chrome plated brass and although easy to drill, should act as a great guide for your hole in the SS post.
    I have a few of these for an upcoming secret thing LOL
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  8. #8
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    Great advice Sv. I'm keen to mod my own BF atty and this will help, and make me wait longer so I can do it properly
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  9. #9
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    When you mass produce an item that has drilled holes, you use a drill jig that does the same thing as what you've described. The difference is in the material, where a case hardened hole (or alternatively, a hardened bush) is used to minimise wear in the jig.
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  10. #10
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    When using very small drill bits try spotting your start by quickly touching the drill bit a few times ( while spinning) before you start drilling. This can help with starting the hole in the right spot. This stops any wander of the drill which can cause the drill bit to break.

    Dremels will achieve the speeds that you need for small drill bits. You are better of blunting a drill bit than breaking it in the hole which is more likely at slow speeds. If the bit stops cutting don't keep forcing the cut. Stop and change the bit out to a new one.

    Buy good quality drill bits not the cheapest you can find

    Cheers
    Midlife
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