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Thread: How many spare batteries can you carry for international travel

  1. #1
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    How many spare batteries can you carry for international travel

    I think we come up with this question from time to time so I have emailed to CASA and their response is quoted below. I believe this applies to all kind of rechargeable batteries and CASA did mention that traveller should check on the airline restriction on liquid as they varies from one to another.

    "1. Carriage of Li-ion batteries: You are limited to two spare Li-ion batteries which must be carried in your carry-on baggage. You must ensure that the terminals are protected so that short circuit and overheat of the battery does not occur. You can do this by either covering the terminals with electrical tape; place each battery in a separate sealed zip lock bag; or pack each separately in a protective pouch.

    The batteries may be between 100 Wh and 160 Wh rating maximum.

    2. As far as the e liquid is concerned, since you are travelling on separate airline carriers over more than one sector, it would be best to consult with those airlines directly, as the limits placed on liquids for international travel are more restrictive.

    3. The blunt tip syringe will be okay for travel in your baggage, but ensure that it is free of any liquid. If any liquid remains, then ensure that you pack it in absorbent material and place inside a sealed zip lock bag in the event that it leaks. It would be best to pack this in your checked baggage to avoid any issues with security screening, as some areas may be more restrictive, especially with international carriers."


    I think I read it somewhere if you want to convert Wh into mAH is as below:

    mAH = WH x 1000 /V

    So taking the above 160 Wh as an example for a Li-ion 4.2 volt 18500 battery of 1700 mAH would be:

    1700 mAH = WH x 1000 / 4.2
    which WH is 7.14 (way below the restriction range)

    A 18650 Li-ion 4.2v of 3400 mAH would be:

    3400 mAH = WH x 1000 / 4.2
    Which WH is 14.28 (way below the restriction range)
    Last edited by porkchop; 05-11-13 at 03:45 PM.
    Quit on 10.06.2013
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  2. #2
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    That's quite handy to know, thanks for posting.
    I wonder if it's any different for domestic flights? I'm possibly heading to Melbourne and Perth next month, guess I should start finding all this stuff out now



    I'm not fat, I just ate somebody who was.

  3. #3
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    http://www.casa.gov.au/scripts/nc.dl...::pc=PC_100484

    From what I can gather here, batteries under 100wh have an unrestricted amount you may carry on you. As long as batteries are properly stored and taken as carry-on baggage.

    There was a CASA poster on the wall of an aero club I hire out of sometimes, and also from what I could gather (assuming the regulation was still current) stated that the amount of batteries under 100wh that may be carried was not limited.
    Next time I'm there I can take a photo if you wish. Looked fairly helpful as it had all the information in table form.

    Also blackdog. Any flights originating in Australia would have to comply with these regulations.
    BlackDog and bikam0wz like this.

  4. #4
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    http://www.casa.gov.au/wcmswr/_asset...ery_poster.pdf


    ..... And here is link to said poster.
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  5. #5
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    I'm traveling back to the UK next year for a holiday and was wondering about taking my vaping stuff with me, thank you for the info

  6. #6
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    Cheers OJ



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  7. #7
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    No problem

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by oj991 View Post
    Civil Aviation Safety Authority - Lithium batteries

    From what I can gather here, batteries under 100wh have an unrestricted amount you may carry on you. As long as batteries are properly stored and taken as carry-on baggage.

    There was a CASA poster on the wall of an aero club I hire out of sometimes, and also from what I could gather (assuming the regulation was still current) stated that the amount of batteries under 100wh that may be carried was not limited.
    Next time I'm there I can take a photo if you wish. Looked fairly helpful as it had all the information in table form.

    Also blackdog. Any flights originating in Australia would have to comply with these regulations.
    I have dangerous goods permits to carry larger batteries on airplanes for my work.
    I can confirm that as long as your lithium batteries are under 100Wh, You are not limited to how many you can carry as "Carry on" Luggage only.
    The terminals must be taped or be packaged in original packaging or packaged in a way to stop shorting, I'm pretty confident this applies to every airline around the world.
    And for example if you could have a 4500Mah PV Battery running at 22.2Volts you would be still under the 100Wh limit. = 99.9Wh
    Last edited by Up in vapour; 05-11-13 at 08:54 PM.
    oj991 likes this.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by porkchop View Post
    I think I read it somewhere if you want to convert Wh into mAH is as below:

    mAH = WH x 1000 /V
    A 18650 Li-ion 4.2v of 3400 mAH would be:
    It's usual to use the nominal terminal voltage when calculating Wh, so 3.7V should be used. So for example:

    Wh = 2600/1000 * 3.7
    Wh = 9.6 Wh

    which is well below the limit to even classify as a large fuel cell. As others have said, that limit *only* applies to "fuel cells" of between 100 and 160 Wh and they are some pretty big batteries. Most airlines have the same information eg Qantas: Dangerous Goods | Qantas

    I'd say CASAA completely missed the point when you contacted them.

    Liquids are fine, but for international flights you are limited to 100ml per bottle in your carry-on and that should in a ziplock bag to avoid any issues in the case of a leak. Leaks actually can be a big issue and it's a very good idea to empty any clearos or tanks before you board. Also see just below the paragraph I linked above, he Qantas advisory on "e-cigs"
    oj991 likes this.
    Chris: Tobacco free since 17:00 15th March 2013.

  10. #10
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    3 x 60ml good tobacco juice should be no problem for 3 weeks travel

    Quote Originally Posted by fabricator4 View Post
    It's usual to use the nominal terminal voltage when calculating Wh, so 3.7V should be used. So for example:

    Wh = 2600/1000 * 3.7
    Wh = 9.6 Wh

    which is well below the limit to even classify as a large fuel cell. As others have said, that limit *only* applies to "fuel cells" of between 100 and 160 Wh and they are some pretty big batteries. Most airlines have the same information eg Qantas: Dangerous Goods | Qantas

    I'd say CASAA completely missed the point when you contacted them.

    Liquids are fine, but for international flights you are limited to 100ml per bottle in your carry-on and that should in a ziplock bag to avoid any issues in the case of a leak. Leaks actually can be a big issue and it's a very good idea to empty any clearos or tanks before you board. Also see just below the paragraph I linked above, he Qantas advisory on "e-cigs"
    Quit on 10.06.2013
    Ave Smoked: 15-20/Day for 22 years
    Spent on Smoke: $600/month when 1 pack = $18

 

 

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