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Thread: Tcr

  1. #1
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    Tcr

    Hi everyone,

    Im getting into tc vaping at the moment rocking staggered ss claptions 350 f
    Tcr 0.00096

    Can someone help me understand tcr?

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    Life is about choices. Some we regret, some we’re proud of. Some will haunt us forever. The message: we are what we chose to be.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by JakeFloyd View Post
    Hi everyone,

    Im getting into tc vaping at the moment rocking staggered ss claptions 350 f
    Tcr 0.00096

    Can someone help me understand tcr?

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    Thermal Coefficient of Resistivity. It's the amount in ohms that the resistance changes per degree (C or K). In your case that means you have it set to expect 0.00096 ohms increase in resistance for every degree the temperature rises. As you can see if the mod reads in 0.001 increments then it will have trouble seeing 10 degrees rise in temperature. Fortunately this is close enough, but anything smaller than that will be problematic. (nichrome for example would not be great). this also explains why if you or the mod gets the baseline cold resistance even 0.02 ohms out of true, it can give you an instant dry hit.

    You'll more often see TCR expressed as powers of 10, which in this case would be 96 x 10-5 while many mods just use the whole number without the power factor eg: "096"

    I use a TCR of 0.00093 for SS316 but the engineering pocket protector answer is actually 0.000879 (notice it's to the sixth place which (most) mods don't do). The reason that 0.00088 doesn't work I believe has to do with the resistance of the atty and connections and the non-heated part of the wire. I only mention this discrepancy in case you come across it on other forums.

    If you have the TCR too high it will be too hot, TCR too low it will be too cold.
    Chris: Tobacco free since 17:00 15th March 2013.

  3. #3
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    Thats great thank you for taking the time to write that

    Sent from my SM-G930F using Tapatalk
    Life is about choices. Some we regret, some we’re proud of. Some will haunt us forever. The message: we are what we chose to be.

  4. #4
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    Excellent answer fab!

    I'd just like to add.....TCR gives you a "straight line" (linear) graph of resistance/temperature, where resistance is directly proportional to temperature. In reality the tcr of the wire varies slightly at different temperatures.

    Some mods, allow you to use TFR, Temperature Factors of Resistance, usually via a CSV file. This file has multiple TCR values for different ranges of temperature, that outputs a temperature/resistance curve, which is more accurate than the linear TCR.

 

 

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